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Alarm Fatigue Excerpt

The alarm fatigue issue is national patient safety goal number 6 as identified by The Joint Commission.

 

An excerpt is below:

 

1.

Identify the most important alarm signals to manage based on the following:

– Input from the medical staff and clinical departments

– Risk to patients if the alarm signal is not attended to or if it malfunctions

– Whether specific alarm signals are needed or unnecessarily contribute to alarm noise

and alarm fatigue

– Potential for patient harm based on internal incident history

– Published best practices and guidelines

(For more information on managing medical equipment risks, refer to Standard

EC.02.04.01.)

  1. A

As of January 1, 2016, establish policies and procedures for managing the alarms

identified in EP 2 above that, at a minimum, address the following:

– Clinically appropriate settings for alarm signals

– When alarm signals can be disabled

– When alarm parameters can be changed

– Who in the organization has the authority to set alarm parameters

– Who in the organization has the authority to change alarm parameters

– Who in the organization has the authority to set alarm parameters to “off”

– Monitoring and responding to alarm signals

– Checking individual alarm signals for accurate settings, proper operation, and

detectability

(For more information, refer to Standard EC.02.04.03)

 

You can access the entire document at the following website:

 

http://www.jointcommission.org/standards_information/npsgs.aspx

 

I hope this helps.  If you want specifics on how we have addressed the matter here feel free to contact me directly.

 

Michael Shepherd, BS, CBET

Biomedical Equipment Technician II

Grande Ronde Hospital

(541)963-1559

Michael.Shepherd@grh.org

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